High Country News

"The Meaning of Refuge" at Fishtrap by Bear Guerra

Ruxandra is a contributing editor with High Country News, the almost-50-year-old national magazine about the West. Coming up later this month, she’ll be participating in “The Meaning of Refuge” at Winter Fishtrap in Josephy, OR, moderated by editor-in-chief, Brian Calvert:

“Is refuge for all living things something of a natural right? There are many interpretations of what "refuge" means in the West, from wildlife and plant refuge in climate change, the Malheur standoff and other threats to public lands. Join the High Country News Editorial staff for an in-depth exploration of "Refuge" in regards to the environment, our communities, and inward towards our own personal refuge.”

More on Winter Fishtrap, January 18-20, 2019, here.

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New Opinion Piece: Migrants’ Endless Walk North by Bear Guerra

“In a now-retracted description, the Associated Press called the caravan ‘a ragtag army of the poor.’ But I see this latest migrant pilgrimage as something entirely different: a bold people’s movement aimed at subverting the class disparities and strict immigration enforcement of a system deliberately stacked against working-class migrants.” Read the whole piece here.

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New Feature: A California Mayor Wants His Beach Town to Retreat From the Shore by Bear Guerra

“At the start of each year, Southern California gets a glimpse into a future of rising seas, through an annual event called the king tide. On that day, the sun, moon, and Earth align to create a heavy gravitational pull, leading to the highest tides of the year. If “king tide” sounds ominous, that’s because it is, particularly for a city like Imperial Beach, a small coastal town near the Mexican border surrounded by water on three sides: San Diego Bay to the north, the Pacific Ocean to the west, and the Tijuana River Delta to the south.”

Read the full feature in The Atlantic here.

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Photo Essay: An Inventory of Loss on the Los Angeles River by Bear Guerra

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"These images represent the erasure of incredible diversity and beauty from the collective memory of Angelenos. But they also hint at a possible future for the city, which is currently debating a river revitalization effort. Though the river will never again flow in its natural state, some habitat restoration may allow for the return of animals that have sought refuge elsewhere. Given the city’s history of putting development before preservation, it remains to be seen what direction revitalization will take. But if we can remember what was lost, then certainly we can imagine what might be again."

Bear's latest, over at High Country News.