aging

Exile in White: A #VQRTrueStory Essay by Bear Guerra

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"It’s Friday morning. As has been his custom for almost three decades, Miguel Natividad Borrayo is dressed in white, from his T-shirt to his shoes, to honor those imprisoned for challenging the Castro regime—men like him, who spent seventeen years doing hard labor.

“White symbolizes peace,” says Miguel. “It’s how I protest.” But there was nothing peaceful about what got him in trouble to begin with. Back in 1961, he was a thirty-two-year-old career officer in the Cuban Navy. He’d been a staunch supporter of US-backed dictator Fulgencio Batista until Fidel Castro’s successful guerrilla uprising in 1959."

Read and view the photos of our essay for Virginia Quarterly Review here.

Going Gray in LA travels to the Los Angeles Public Library by Ruxandra Guidi

Following Broadway, an 18-mile avenue that cuts through the working-class heart of Los Angeles, last year we journeyed from Lincoln Heights, into Chinatown, through Downtown, and on to South LA to find out how our city is changing and what makes life worth living — as we grow old in Los Angeles. This photo exhibit will live at the first floor galleries of the LA Public Library downtown from October 6, 2017 until January 25, 2018. Free and open to all ages!

More on the exhibit here.

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"Going Gray in LA" & the LA Aging Advocacy Coalition by Bear Guerra

This June, we gave a final presentation about our storytelling project, "Going Gray in LA" to a large crowd of social workers, aging researchers, medical doctors and other providers who are advocating for the rights of older adults in Los Angeles County. We were joined by Kenwood Jung, a housing rights activist from Chinatown, and Michelle Cotton, a family caregiver from South Los Angeles -- both of whom we spent time with for our stories. 

You're Invited: The Final Event for "Going Gray in LA" by Bear Guerra

In the coming decades, Los Angeles is going to look a lot grayer. A County’s senior population will doubl in the next 15 year. ousing, health care and the job market will have to adapt to a population that is working and living longer in a city built for the young. 

On Sunday, April 9th, 2017, join us at Los Angeles' Japanese American National Museum for a live conversation and exhibit documenting an 18-mile avenue stretch of Broadway, cutting through the working class heart of the city; from Lincoln Heights, into Chinatown, through Downtown, and on to South LA.

 

"Going Gray in LA" moves down Broadway to Downtown by Bear Guerra

Our year-long multimedia collaboration with KCRW Public Radio, Going Gray in LA, continues this month with new stories about senior hunger, about Little Tokyo as a great example for aging in place, and about a man whose life changed when Fidel Castro came to power in 1959. Thank you to the Eisner Foundation for the support.