california

New Feature: A California Mayor Wants His Beach Town to Retreat From the Shore by Bear Guerra

“At the start of each year, Southern California gets a glimpse into a future of rising seas, through an annual event called the king tide. On that day, the sun, moon, and Earth align to create a heavy gravitational pull, leading to the highest tides of the year. If “king tide” sounds ominous, that’s because it is, particularly for a city like Imperial Beach, a small coastal town near the Mexican border surrounded by water on three sides: San Diego Bay to the north, the Pacific Ocean to the west, and the Tijuana River Delta to the south.”

Read the full feature in The Atlantic here.

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Latest Essay, in Mother Jones Magazine by Bear Guerra

We’re not used to seeing the well-to-do as victims of natural catastrophes, as if they and their neighborhoods should be exempt by virtue of their economic power—as if life inside a well-constructed, gated compound guarantees security. But in this era of manmade climate change—as California’s rapid development collides with drought, fires, torrential rains—that illusion no longer holds. These disasters affect everyone eventually. Yet it’s when we try to recover from them that our class differences become starkest.

Read the essay here.

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You're Invited: The Final Event for "Going Gray in LA" by Bear Guerra

In the coming decades, Los Angeles is going to look a lot grayer. A County’s senior population will doubl in the next 15 year. ousing, health care and the job market will have to adapt to a population that is working and living longer in a city built for the young. 

On Sunday, April 9th, 2017, join us at Los Angeles' Japanese American National Museum for a live conversation and exhibit documenting an 18-mile avenue stretch of Broadway, cutting through the working class heart of the city; from Lincoln Heights, into Chinatown, through Downtown, and on to South LA.