climate change

New Feature: A California Mayor Wants His Beach Town to Retreat From the Shore by Bear Guerra

“At the start of each year, Southern California gets a glimpse into a future of rising seas, through an annual event called the king tide. On that day, the sun, moon, and Earth align to create a heavy gravitational pull, leading to the highest tides of the year. If “king tide” sounds ominous, that’s because it is, particularly for a city like Imperial Beach, a small coastal town near the Mexican border surrounded by water on three sides: San Diego Bay to the north, the Pacific Ocean to the west, and the Tijuana River Delta to the south.”

Read the full feature in The Atlantic here.

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Latest Essay, in Mother Jones Magazine by Bear Guerra

We’re not used to seeing the well-to-do as victims of natural catastrophes, as if they and their neighborhoods should be exempt by virtue of their economic power—as if life inside a well-constructed, gated compound guarantees security. But in this era of manmade climate change—as California’s rapid development collides with drought, fires, torrential rains—that illusion no longer holds. These disasters affect everyone eventually. Yet it’s when we try to recover from them that our class differences become starkest.

Read the essay here.

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Between the Forest and the Sea, Part 2 by Bear Guerra

The second multimedia slideshow from our Guna (or Kuna) Yala files: We follow Andrés de León and the Yarsuisuit collective, a group of men who grow and harvest food sustainably in the Guna mainland forest. Thanks in part to their exceptional sovereignty and land tenure, the Guna have preserved their primary forests for hundreds of years through their cooperative use of the land and their cultural and spiritual traditions rooted in conservation. This series was made possible by a grant from Mongabay.com.

Watch the slideshow here.

Why a Tribe in Panama Rejected Pay for their Carbon-Rich Forests by Bear Guerra

Our first story in a series produced thanks to Mongabay.org's Special Reporting Initiative tells the story of why the Kuna peoples of Panama have voted against the prevailing global program to stop deforestation:

Over 12 million hectares of forests are lost every year worldwide due to deforestation releasing carbon into the atmosphere. Paying forest-dwellers to keep trees standing is REDD+’s important mandate, but one that doesn't sit well with many indigenous peoples, including the Kuna.

Read the story here.