environment

"The Meaning of Refuge" at Fishtrap by Bear Guerra

Ruxandra is a contributing editor with High Country News, the almost-50-year-old national magazine about the West. Coming up later this month, she’ll be participating in “The Meaning of Refuge” at Winter Fishtrap in Josephy, OR, moderated by editor-in-chief, Brian Calvert:

“Is refuge for all living things something of a natural right? There are many interpretations of what "refuge" means in the West, from wildlife and plant refuge in climate change, the Malheur standoff and other threats to public lands. Join the High Country News Editorial staff for an in-depth exploration of "Refuge" in regards to the environment, our communities, and inward towards our own personal refuge.”

More on Winter Fishtrap, January 18-20, 2019, here.

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Chatting About Science & the Implications of Migration by Bear Guerra

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This Fall, the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum will join the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability to produce a three-night conversation between the people of Los Angeles and the leading experts on migration. Looking across species and time, we strip away politics and nation-state boundaries to discover the causes and outcomes of migration for all life forms.

Join us October 18 (A New Home, The Effects of Migration) and November 1 (Los Angeles, A Migration Haven) for these live conversations, moderated by Ruxandra Guidi.

Free and open to the public. RSVP here.

South of Fletcher Launches by Bear Guerra

Say hello to our new limited-run podcast, "South of Fletcher: Stories from the Bowtie"!

It's the story of a seemingly nondescript piece of land in northeast LA -- a former rail yard that is set to become a park. But it's also a meditation on whose voices are heard in discussions about the future of a city, whose histories become part of our collective memory, and the traces we leave behind when landscapes are altered and neighborhoods change. Done in conjunction with (and with thanks to) LA-based arts organization, Clockshop.

Our accompanying photo and video exhibit will be up at Occidental College's Weingart Gallery until November 4. You're all invited for the opening this Thursday, September 13th, 5-8 pm. 

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A Trip Through Ecuador’s Cofán Community  by Bear Guerra

Bear's collaboration with anthropologist Michael Cepek last year sees the light in this photo and print essay out in Pacific Standard Magazine:

"The more than 500 Cofán people who live in Dureno don’t fit most Western stereotypes of how native Amazonians are supposed to look or act. They don’t wear loincloths or paint their bodies. They don’t lounge around in hammocks and play wooden flutes all day... To most outsiders, the Cofán don’t look indigenous — they look poor and defeated."

Balu Wala, or the Kuna Good Life by Bear Guerra

Our latest piece done with the support of a Mongabay Special Reporting Initiative fellowship is out:

At 85 years old, Don Jesús is finally realizing one of his lifelong dreams: to formally teach Kuna, also known as Guna, traditions to the next generation of boys and girls. Every week, he illustrates and jots down definitions of dozens of artifacts, plants, and customs that have been integral parts of his culture for hundreds of years. By putting them down on paper, he’s preparing for his next weekly class, but also, keeping a record before he forgets. He’s doing this to make sure his people don’t forget as well.

Read our story for IC Magazine here.