storytelling

On How to Make Collaborative Stories that Don't Fit in the Podcast Box by Bear Guerra

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How can audio storytelling translate to — and interact with — media like photography and print, and platforms like public installations and live events? And how to conceive and develop such projects?

Brand-new on the Third Coast Pocket Conference podcast: Ruxandra Guidi and Sayre Quevedo of Latino USA chat about (and give some ideas) for how to make beautiful, collaborative stories that don't fit in a box or even a podcast feed.

Listen to the episode here.

Our "South of Fletcher" Podcast Wraps by Bear Guerra

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South of Fletcher podcast has officially wrapped! But you can still get all caught up here.

Once one of Southern California’s most important rail yards, this site will soon become the next urban California State Park, joining a patchwork of other river-adjacent green spaces that are shaping the course of LA River revitalization. Through personal interviews with people who have worked, lived and otherwise made their marks at this post-industrial site, Fonografia Collective explores some of LA’s biggest challenges, and speculates about what change at this site might mean for the rest of the city. Written and co-produced by Ruxandra Guidi and Clockshop, edited by Ibby Caputo and with music by Luis Guerra.

"Going Gray in LA" & the LA Aging Advocacy Coalition by Bear Guerra

This June, we gave a final presentation about our storytelling project, "Going Gray in LA" to a large crowd of social workers, aging researchers, medical doctors and other providers who are advocating for the rights of older adults in Los Angeles County. We were joined by Kenwood Jung, a housing rights activist from Chinatown, and Michelle Cotton, a family caregiver from South Los Angeles -- both of whom we spent time with for our stories. 

You're Invited: The Final Event for "Going Gray in LA" by Bear Guerra

In the coming decades, Los Angeles is going to look a lot grayer. A County’s senior population will doubl in the next 15 year. ousing, health care and the job market will have to adapt to a population that is working and living longer in a city built for the young. 

On Sunday, April 9th, 2017, join us at Los Angeles' Japanese American National Museum for a live conversation and exhibit documenting an 18-mile avenue stretch of Broadway, cutting through the working class heart of the city; from Lincoln Heights, into Chinatown, through Downtown, and on to South LA.

 

Bringing LA's Chinatown and Little Tokyo together through Takachizu by Bear Guerra

On January 14th, we'll be joining a group of artists, storytellers and activists to host Takachizu: Staying Home.

The gathering in English, Cantonese and Japanese will feature photos, multimedia, food, conversation and personal stories about what it means to make a home in a big city like LA--and what it takes to stay there.

To listen/see our stories from Little Tokyo and Chinatown visit our Going Gray in L.A. website.