virginia quarterly review

New Essay: "The People In Their Labyrinth" by Bear Guerra

“In El Hatillo, a middle-class neighborhood on the outskirts of Caracas, Venezuela, there is a three-story building that looks as if it’s falling apart: The cream-colored paint is peeling off the walls and the garden is overgrown, wild, a place breeding critters of all kinds. In a room on the third floor, there is a large collection of supermarket cardboard boxes piled on top of one another.”

Read the rest of the essay (subscription needed) here.

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Exile in White: A #VQRTrueStory Essay by Bear Guerra

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"It’s Friday morning. As has been his custom for almost three decades, Miguel Natividad Borrayo is dressed in white, from his T-shirt to his shoes, to honor those imprisoned for challenging the Castro regime—men like him, who spent seventeen years doing hard labor.

“White symbolizes peace,” says Miguel. “It’s how I protest.” But there was nothing peaceful about what got him in trouble to begin with. Back in 1961, he was a thirty-two-year-old career officer in the Cuban Navy. He’d been a staunch supporter of US-backed dictator Fulgencio Batista until Fidel Castro’s successful guerrilla uprising in 1959."

Read and view the photos of our essay for Virginia Quarterly Review here.

Starting Over: An Essay by Bear Guerra

Our new written and photographic essay, part of our "Going Gray in LA" stories done in collaboration with KCRW, is up at The Virginia Quarterly Review: 

"When asked about why he moved to the US well into his fifties, Song says, 'I left China because there were some things I still wanted to do in my life, and I didn't want to admit I was too old for it.' Like so many immigrants before him, he had a vision of American as a magical place, 'almost like a paradise in the West.'"

 

New Story: Ecuador's Rocket Frog by Bear Guerra

Our latest collaboration is a story for Virginia Quarterly Review, about a small uncharismatic frog that was once believed to be extinct but then was later rediscovered. It's a story about how people in Ecuador mobilized to make sure he wouldn't disappear once again; an unlikely tale of conservation in an age of mass extinctions.

Read the story and see the photo essay here.